25Mar2015

2016 Solar Eclipse Expedition Cruise – Book Now!

Cruise promo

Dave Reneke – Guest Astronomer for Coral Princess 2016 Solar Eclipse expedition cruise.

This is certainly going to be a once in a lifetime adventure! If you’ve never seen totality see it now on this unique cruise! 

(NOTE: This cruise has now sold out and will sail on 4 March  2016)

Australia’s small ship cruise line Coral Princess Cruises has announced that David Reneke, one of Australia’s most well-known astronomy experts, will be joining their expedition team to witness the total solar eclipse occurring in Indonesia on the morning of 09 March 2016.

Throughout the expedition Dave will be inviting guests to take part in a series of astronomy lectures and Q&As, as well as providing expert commentary throughout the morning of the total solar eclipse and regular star gazing sessions.

The 1,200gt mono-hull will be anchored close to the Indonesian island of Pulau Jiew, a prime viewing position along the centreline of the eclipse path

Coral Princess’s flagship Oceanic Discoverer will be anchored close to the Indonesian island of Pulau Jiew, a prime viewing position along the centreline of the eclipse path, as part of a longer itinerary featuring Papua New Guinea and West Papua’s Raja Ampat and Spice Islands.

Guests will be able to experience the entire three hour transition of the moon, including some three and  a half minutes of totality, where ‘day turns to night’ as the moon completely obscures the sun.

Enjoy your meals on the decks of the Oceanic Discoverer

Two itineraries are on offer to experience the eclipse; a 24-night New Guinea Circle programme commences in Alotau (Papua New Guinea) on 23 February 2016 and incorporates the Eastern PNG coast, Raja Ampat and the Spice Islands before concluding in Darwin, whilst a shorter 14-night option from Wewak to Darwin departing on 04 April 2016 is also available.

coral

Many ‘island hops’ are included in this once in a lifetime package

The 24-night New Guinea Circle starts at $20,290 per person whilst the 14-night expedition is priced from $13,160 per person. Prices include all meals, lectures and services of the all-Australian expedition staff and excursions aboard a fleet of zodiacs, glass bottom boat, kayaks and the unique ‘Xplorer’ excursion tender.

Coral Princess Cruises pioneered small-ship expedition cruising in Australia and the South Pacific in 1984. In addition to the Kimberley expedition, the company operates year-round small ship cruises on the Great Barrier Reef from Cairns, along with an enthralling 11-night Cape York & Arnhem Land adventure between Cairns and Darwin.

Further afield, Papua New Guinea, the Islands of the South Pacific, New Zealand and the Raja Ampat and Spice Islands regions of Indonesia feature in the company’s exciting range of itineraries throughout the South Pacific and South East Asia.

Raja Ampat And Spice Islands With Coral Princess Cruises

Bookings or More Information

Keen to go? I thought so. For further information and reservations contact Coral Princess Cruises on 1800 079 545 or visit www.coralprincess.com.au.

FREE Information Night

Cruise Cap

About Dave Reneke…

Special Guest Astronomer – David Reneke

We are excited to announce that David Reneke, one of Australia’s most well-known and respected amateur astronomers and presenters, will be our Special Guest Lecturer on this unforgettable expedition.David, has over 40 years experience in astronomy with links to some of the world’s leading astronomical institutions. David is the Editor for Australia’s Astro-Space News Magazine and is now affiliated as a writer and publicist for the prestigious Australasian Science magazine.

David teaches astronomy at college level, is an invited speaker at astronomy conventions throughout Australia, a feature writer for major Australian newspapers, and is a science correspondent for ABC and commercial radio stations. In these weekly radio interviews David regularly appears on over 60 networked stations across Australia with all the latest news and on general astronomy and space discovery issues.

David’s audience numbers around 4 million listeners weekly! Throughout the expedition David will present a series of interesting astronomy lectures, lead star gazing in the evening and of course provide expert commentary throughout the morning of the eclipse.

 Solar Eclipses Are A Mass Spectacle!

Though eclipses have been observed and recorded for thousands of years, eclipse chasing began only about 150 years ago. In 1851, hundreds of astronomers travelled to Norway to see an eclipse, marking, perhaps, the first great eclipse expedition. From then on, expeditions have been pursuing most of the world’s eclipses in accessible locations.


In June 1973, a modified Concorde airliner took seven astronomers on board to track an eclipse. The aircraft had viewing ports in the roof for observing the eclipse overhead. Flying at its maximum speed of 2400km/h at an altitude of 17,000m, the Concorde flew a short course across the curved eclipse path, as if it were cutting a corner on a winding road. Across sub-Saharan Africa, from Mauritania to Chad, the Concorde managed to stay in the shadow for 74 minutes before being overtaken.

During the 20th century, a movement of amateur astronomers and nature lovers began chasing eclipses around the globe for sheer enjoyment. By the end of the century, the number of participants had swollen to tens of thousands for each eclipse. Up to 40,000 people visited Africa in June 2001, and it’s thought as many visited Australia and Africa to see the eclipses in December 2002.

If you think of solar eclipses, you’ll conjure up a mental picture from a ground-based reference point. Viewed on a global scale, the picture changes dramatically. For the Ceduna eclipse of 4 December 2002, the shadow crossed the Indian Ocean travelling at about 3000km/h. By the time it reached Ceduna it was accelerating rapidly and had reached 23,000km/h.

On 4 December 2002, a solar eclipse crossed over the Atlantic, 2000km north-west of Angola, Africa. Three hours later, the eclipse’s shadow had travelled half-way around the world to the Australian southern coast at Ceduna, SA. Within minutes it would race across an 800km long and 30km wide sliver of outback Australia between Ceduna and Cameron Corner.

An estimated 40,000 eclipse chasers gathered along beaches and highways, in streets and parks, at camping grounds, car parks and sportsgrounds, in small towns and on outback properties.

Cruise Prices

Two itineraries are on offer to experience the eclipse; a 24-night New Guinea Circle programme commences in Alotau (Papua New Guinea) on 23 February 2016 and incorporates the Eastern PNG coast, Raja Ampat and the Spice Islands before concluding in Darwin, whilst a shorter 14-night option from Wewak to Darwin departing on 04 April 2016 is also available.

The 24-night New Guinea Circle starts at $20,290 per person whilst the 14-night expedition is priced from $13,160 per person. Prices include all meals, lectures and services of the all-Australian expedition staff and excursions aboard a fleet of zodiacs, glass bottom boat, kayaks and the unique ‘Xplorer’ excursion tender.

For further information and reservations contact Coral Princess Cruises on 1800 079 545 or visit www.coralprincess.com.au.

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