society

ASSA Quiz Night 2017

Saturday, 14th of October 2017 at 7:30pm

(Hurry last 2-days to book! Come along for a night of entertainment,

challenging questions, and great prizes!)

Eclipse Room, 4th Floor, Union Building

University of Adelaide

North Terrace, Adelaide

Your Quiz Masters – Aris Moustakas & Paul Curnow

Abstract: Come along for a fun night and help celebrate the Astronomical Society of South Australia’s 125th Anniversary at the ‘ASSA Quiz Night 2017’. All questions are general knowledge and members and non-members are very welcome to attend. Tables are strictly limited to 10-people each and all tickets are $10.00 per person (small online booking fee applies). Book online via Eventbrite. Organise a table and book online now – strictly limited seating! Please note: bring your own soft drinks and munchies for your table. However, alcohol will be sold at the bar on the night by the University of Adelaide Club. Attendees will not be able to bring along their own alcohol because under the conditions of hire of the facility the ASSA will not be covered under the liquor licensing act.

Book online at: https://www.assa.org.au/events/other/quiz-night/

For further information visit: http://www.assa.org.au/ or contact the Publicity Officer on: 0402 079 578 or at starmanzone@adam.com.au

 

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The Australian Meteorological & Oceanographic Society, Australian Meteorological Association, and Australian Institute of Physics present a public lecture:

Anticipating the atmosphere: a look at the modern weather forecast process

Thursday 2nd of November 2017 at 6.30 pm

Kerr Grant lecture theatre
Physics Building,
The University of Adelaide (off Victoria Drive)

 Benjamin Owen

Meteorologist, South Australian Regional Forecasting Centre
Australian Bureau of Meteorology

Our complex relationship with the world around is no more apparent than that we share with the weather. On a personal level, weather has the potential to make or break our day, whether it be warm and sunny or cold, wet and windy. From a commercial perspective, weather plays a critical role to a range of important industries which include aviation, agriculture and energy. And probably on the most profound level, weather has the potential to deliver catastrophic destruction in a relatively short time frame. It is therefore unsurprising that we depend on weather forecasts to best prepare and respond to the future weather as appropriate.

Over the past 50 years, our ability to accurately predict the weather has improved dramatically. While our understanding of the atmosphere has certainly evolved over this time, the most significant advances have come through improvements in the tools a forecaster has at their disposal. Where the challenge of 50 years ago was trying to make a forecast from the sparse information available, the challenge today is trying to create the best possible forecast from the vast amount of information available. In this talk, we take a look at exactly how forecasters go about creating a weather forecast, considering the tools used to capture the current and future state of the atmosphere, and how these are used to translate this into the forecast that is sent out to the world.

The lecture will be held in the Kerr Grant Lecture Theatre, Physics Building, University of Adelaide, North Terrace at 6.30 pm. Members of the public are warmly invited to attend. Please enter via the eastern door of the Physics building, from the roadway between the Scott Theatre and the Hub Building. There will be a person at the door to let people into the building until 6:30 p.m. Refreshments will be available in Room G10 on the ground floor from 6:00 p.m.

Enquires: For more details, contact Murray Hamilton, chair of the AMOS South Australia branch (murray.hamilton@adelaide.edu.au). If there are issues with access on the night, please phone 0478 453 642.

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 The Adelaide Planetarium at the University of South Australia presents

 The Night Sky

 Tuesdays 16th of January – 20th of March 2018

(Only 44-places available [don’t miss the 2018 intake -next course intake 2020] – hurry now booking!)

7:30pm – 10:00pm

Adelaide Planetarium,

Mawson Lakes Campus,

University of South Australia

 Paul Curnow

Adelaide Planetarium

University of South Australia

 Abstract: Join popular astronomer Paul Curnow for a 10-week introductory astronomy course at the Adelaide Planetarium. Ever wondered how astronomers find their way around the night sky? Under the dome of the planetarium, come and learn how to find the different constellations (patterns) in the sky and learn about the mythology related to them. Learn about the planets in our solar system and some of the moons orbiting them. Discover the history behind astronomy and how early astronomers worked out the distances to stars, the magnitude of stars and more about the deep sky wonders of our galaxy. Learn about purchasing your first telescope and the best places to view the night sky. This is one of the few courses in the world that has access to a planetarium as a teaching tool.

Bio: Bio: Paul Curnow [B.ED] is the Vice President of the Astronomical Society of South Australia (member since 1991) and a former council member of the Field Geology Club of South Australia. He has been a lecturer at the Adelaide Planetarium since 1992 and was the recipient of the ASSA editor’s award for 2000; 2010; and then again in 2013. In 2002, he served as a southern sky specialist for visiting U.S. and British astronomers who were in Australia for the total solar eclipse. After 25-years of research, he is regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on Australian Aboriginal night sky knowledge; and in 2004, he worked in conjunction with the Lake Erie Nature and Science Center Planetarium in Ohio, on the creation of a show that features Indigenous Australian stories of the night sky. In addition, Paul runs a number of popular courses for the general public that focus on the constellations, planetary astronomy, historical astronomy and ethnoastronomy, which primarily deals with how the night sky is seen by non-western cultures. He appeared as the keynote speaker at the inaugural 2010 Lake Tyrrell Star Party in Sea Lake, Victoria and in 2011 was a special guest speaker at the Carter Observatory in Wellington, New Zealand. Since 2012 Paul has taken the role of Lecturer for the Astronomy & Universe course (EDUC2066) for the School of Education at the University of South Australia. Paul appears regularly in the media and has authored over 50 articles on astronomy.

To be held at the Adelaide Planetarium (upstairs), Building P, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus. Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes SA 5095. BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL. Cost $210.00 per person. Enrolments are subject to the seating capacity of the planetarium, so book early to avoid disappointment. Book online at: https://www.conferenceonline.com/bookingform/index.cfm?page=booking&object=conference&id=22045&bookingid=0&categorykey=A6D57D89-0B30-4256-840D-05DF42B2AE72&CFID=5931228&CFTOKEN=b5275d09454b2fcc-39A7D66C-D0CE-3C59-7B635470B7114EF4 or you can contact the Adelaide Planetarium at 8302 3138, or email the planetarium at adelaide.planetarium@unisa.edu.au To make general course content enquiries only; contact Paul Curnow at starmanzone@adam.com.au

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 The Astronomical Society of South Australia – Celebrating its 125th Anniversary in 2017 presents

Moon Mysteries – A celebration of our nearest celestial neighbour

Wednesday 6th of December 2017 at 8pm

Kerr Grant Lecture Theatre

2nd Floor, Physics Building
University of Adelaide
North Terrace, Adelaide

 Professor Fred Watson

Australian Astronomical Observatory

 Abstract: No celestial object is more assured of a place in the hearts of humans than the Moon, but the sentiment ought to extend beyond mere romantic fervour. Undying gratitude is perhaps more appropriate, since it’s entirely possible that without the Moon, intelligent life might never have evolved on our planet. This is just one of the intriguing insights that current scientific research has uncovered. In this entertaining and fully-illustrated talk, Fred Watson explores the history of our understanding of the Moon from the earliest times through to the space age, and highlights some of the questions that today’s investigations into our natural satellite are addressing.

Bio: Fred Watson comes from a long line of Fred’s, but was the first in his family to become a scientist. He has been an astronomer at the Australian Astronomical Observatory since 1995, and is best known for his radio and TV broadcasts, talks, and other outreach programs, which earned him the 2006 Eureka Prize for Promoting Understanding of Science. He has written a number of popular astronomy books, and has both a science-themed CD and an award-winning symphony libretto to his name. Fred was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2010. He has an asteroid named after him (5691 Fredwatson), but says that if it hits the Earth, it won’t be his fault.

Free – visitors welcome – booking not required

 (*Please note – university security locks entrance doors at 8pm sharp*)

For further information visit: http://www.assa.org.au/

Or contact the Publicity Officer on: 0402 079 578

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 The Astronomical Society of South Australia – Celebrating its 125th Anniversary in 2017 presents

Night Skies of Native America

 Wednesday 1st of November 2017 at 8pm

Kerr Grant Lecture Theatre

2nd Floor, Physics Building
University of Adelaide
North Terrace, Adelaide

 Paul Curnow

ASSA/Adelaide Planetarium

University of South Australia

 Abstract: How do Native Americans believe the universe came into existence? How does the way that Native Americans view the night sky, differ from the classical eighty-eight western constellations used by contemporary astronomers today? Do indigenous populations in South America, and North America, differ on their interpretations, and their belief systems as part of their stellar knowledge? In this talk, I will introduce you to their cultures and peoples, in addition to some of their cosmogony. Moreover, I will look at the significance of the night sky and what we know about it from a First Nations perspective.

Bio: Paul Curnow [B.ED] is the Vice President of the Astronomical Society of South Australia (member since 1991) and a former council member of the Field Geology Club of South Australia. He has been a lecturer at the Adelaide Planetarium since 1992 and was the recipient of the ASSA editor’s award for 2000; 2010; and then again in 2013. In 2002, he served as a southern sky specialist for visiting U.S. and British astronomers who were in Australia for the total solar eclipse. After 25-years of research, he is regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on Australian Aboriginal night sky knowledge; and in 2004, he worked in conjunction with the Lake Erie Nature and Science Center Planetarium in Ohio, on the creation of a show that features Indigenous Australian stories of the night sky.

In addition, Paul runs a number of popular courses for the general public that focus on the constellations, planetary astronomy, historical astronomy and ethnoastronomy, which primarily deals with how the night sky is seen by non-western cultures. He appeared as the keynote speaker at the inaugural 2010 Lake Tyrrell Star Party in Sea Lake, Victoria and in 2011 was a special guest speaker at the Carter Observatory in Wellington, New Zealand. Since 2012 Paul has taken the role of Lecturer for the Astronomy & Universe course (EDUC2066) for the School of Education at the University of South Australia. Paul appears regularly in the media and has authored over 50 articles on astronomy.

Free – visitors welcome – booking not required

 (*Please note – university security locks entrance doors at 8pm sharp*)

For further information visit: http://www.assa.org.au/

Or contact the Publicity Officer on: 0402 079 578

 

 

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