16Jun2017

Hubble Telescope’s Most Amazing Photo Ever

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving Universe — and one of the most colourful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) project.

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving Universe — and one of the most colourful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) project.

NASA is calling it the most interesting image ever taken by the Hubble Space Telescope—and the most comprehensive. It has to be one of the most remarkable mind bending things we’ve ever seen!.

But the image—the amazing payoff of a new study called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field—is more than just beautiful. It may also support to fill in some holes in our knowledge of how stars form.Earlier accounts of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field captured wavelengths of light from visible and near-infrared as well as the far-ultraviolet (UV).

But near-ultraviolet light wasn’t exposed nearly as well. When you add the UV light, you get quite a fantastic view. And what an incredible view it is! The new image, a false-color compiling of shots captured during the passage of 841 orbits of Hubble between 2003 and 2012, contains approximately 10,000 galaxies in a massive variety of shapes and sizes.

Astronomer Phil Plait wrote on Slate. ““The galaxies show every possible shape and size, astronomer. Many are distorted, victims of collisions with other galaxies, their mutual gravity pulling them into weird shapes like taffy quadrillions of kilometers across. Many are very blue, showing active star formation, while others are exceedingly red, probably galaxies much farther away, and their light taking far longer to reach us.

Note that most of the very red galaxies are smaller dots, another indication of their tremendous distance.” Named after astronomer Edwin Hubble, the Hubble Space Telescope is a venture of NASA and the European Space Agency. It was launched in 1990 and has been wowing us ever since. Source:  Physics-Astronomy

Read previous post:
According to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week, researchers have found evidence that Jupiter is the oldest of the planets thanks to an analysis of 19 meteorite samples on Earth.

The new analysis suggests that Jupiter formed only about 1 million years after the dawn of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago.

SEE ALSO: Jupiter is the gigantic, stormy hellscape we always feared

Researchers examining the meteorites found that they appear to be formed from two different reserves of material in the early solar system.

"The most plausible mechanism for this efficient separation is the formation of Jupiter, opening a gap in the disc (a plane of gas and dust from stars) and preventing the exchange of material between the two reservoirs," Thomas Kruijer, lead author of the study, said in a statement.
Jupiter's southern hemisphere.

Jupiter's southern hemisphere.

Image:  NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

Long story short: Jupiter formed so quickly and was so giant that it kept two different reserves of early planetary material from intermingling in the early days of the solar system.

Kruijer and the team of researchers were able to differentiate between the two reservoirs of material by measuring isotopes in the meteorite samples.

They found that each set of material did exist within the same period of time in the early solar system, but they didn't intermix, meaning that something — in this case, Jupiter — must have been keeping them separated.

Scientists aren't able to directly measure meteorites from Jupiter because we don't have any.

"We do not have any samples from Jupiter, in contrast to other bodies like the Earth, Mars, the moon and asteroids," Kruijer said. "In our study, we use isotope signatures of meteorites (which are derived from asteroids) to infer Jupiter's age."

Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel Fiset

These results are far from a sure thing, and it'll still take more research to figure out exactly when and how Jupiter formed in the early days of the solar system.

“We need more evidence that says this is where those two meteorite classes form – one inward and one outward,” Cornell University's Jonathan Lunine told New Scientist of the finding. “But it’s a very nice measurement.”

By learning more about Jupiter, we can also learn more about the evolution of every other planet in the solar system.

Jupiter has more mass than all of the other planets combined, and its immense gravity helped shape the orbits of the other objects in the solar system as they move around the sun.
Our Largest Planet Could Also Be The Oldest

According to a surprising and extensive new study published this...

Flies
Fruit Flies Sent To Space To Help Study The Human Heart

About 6,000 pounds of supplies and science experiments  launched to...

collide
NASA Predicts 5 Asteroids To Fly Close To Earth This Year

NASA continues to be Earth’s “safety net” against threats from...

Close